Boonsboro Reflections


The first of Boonsboro’s 44 half-acre lots was sold in 1792.  By 1801 the Eagle Hotel (now Inn Boonsboro) was built and a post office established.  Peter Conn, the proprietor of the new hotel was also the Town’s first postmaster.   At first, the town grew slowly; in 1803, 11 years after Boonsboro was established, only 24 houses had been built.  But the all-weather turnpike connecting Baltimore and the western settlements facilitated...

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The first macadam surface in the United States was laid on the “Boonsborough Turnpike Road” between Hagerstown and Boonsboro, Maryland.  By 1822, this section was the last unimproved gap in the great National Road leading from Baltimore, on the Chesapeake Bay, to Wheeling, on the Ohio River.   Construction specifications for the turnpike road incorporated those set forth by John Loudon McAdam of Scotland.  The availability...

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Boonsboro’s growth and prosperity certainly benefited from the construction of the Bank Road, later known as the National Road (now Alternate 40).  George Washington and Thomas Jefferson believed that a trans-Appalachian road was necessary for unifying the young country. In 1806 Congress authorized construction of the road and President Jefferson signed the act establishing the National Road.  That turnpike, the first Federally-funded...

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In 1806, construction was completed on Boonsboro’s dual-congregation Salem Church on Potomac Street.  This church, jointly owned and serving both Lutheran and Reformed congregations for many years, was considered one of the finest stone churches in western Maryland.  After the Civil War, the two congregations were able to build separate buildings. In 1870, the cornerstone was laid at the new Trinity Lutheran Church at 64 South Main...

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Settlers in the area established the congregation of Salem Church decades before the founding of Boonsboro.  A log schoolhouse located ½ mile northeast of town along Route 66 served as the worship site. While this structure is long gone, remnants of a graveyard can still be found there.     See other interesting historical facts from our Boonsboro Reflections...

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Boonsboro Reflections: Historic Gravesites   William Boone died in 1798, only six years after founding Boonsboro. He was buried on his land.  In 1802, planning and construction of the Salem Church began on property acquired from the Boone family and the Old Salem Graveyard was established. Today, the Trinity United Church of Christ occupies the site of the Salem Church and the Boone family gravesite can be found in the northwest...

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