Boonsboro Reflections


Boonsboro must have been a chaotic community in September 1862. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia had just invaded the north, occupying Frederick and advancing to take Harper’s Ferry. But George McClellan’s Army of the Potomac pursued him from the east and, on September 14 engaged Lee’s rear guard at the gaps of South Mountain; by the end of the day some 6,100 soldiers were killed, wounded or missing. Jacob Heck (Confederate...

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American families sacrificed greatly during the two years (1917-1918) that the United States fought in “The War to End All Wars.”  Of the approximately 4.7 million men and women that served in the regular U.S. forces, National Guard and draft units, over 116,500 were killed in action or died of disease and other causes.  On July 4, 1919 the South Mountain Council No. 88, Junior Order of United American Mechanics, erected a monument in...

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Elected sheriffs have been enforcing the law in Washington County since 1777, fifteen years before Boonsboro was founded.  Since then, 79 individuals have been elected Washington County Sheriff, confronting all manner of criminal disturbances and, until 1835, serving as the County Tax Collector.   Constables were employed by sheriffs to handle court-related paperwork connected with criminal and civil matters. Boonsboro recognized the...

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Boonsboro’s flag was first unfurled in 1975.   After Mayor Edward. T. Weaver and town council endorsed the idea of creating a flag for Boonsboro, they turned to Pat Lemkuhl, a faculty member at Boonsboro High School.  She organized a flag design contest and Wayne Shifler submitted the winning design.  The flag’s prominent silhouette of a frontiersman with a hoe was to represent the Town’s founders, William and George Boone, settlers...

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Benjamin Franklin was appointed first Postmaster General by the Continental Congress in 1775 and only 26 years later, in 1801, a U.S. Post Office opened in the budding town of Boonsboro.  Patrick Conn, proprietor of the Eagle Hotel (now, Inn BoonsBoro), became our first postmaster.  At that time, postage rates were based on the number of sheets in the letter and the distance a letter traveled, ranging from 8 cents/sheet sent 40 miles...

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Images of covered bridges evoke dreams of slower, simpler times in  American history.  Over the past 200 years 120 such iconic structures carried traffic over Maryland waterways, but today only 6 survive.    Snook’s Creek flows from South Mountain, crossing Alt 40 just south of Mousetown Road as it meanders into Boonsboro.  Just west of the Boonsboro Free Library, the creek crosses Potomac Street (then, Church Street).  This is...

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